Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 11

“From the Depths”


I have not have much chance for update, I was away travelling in the north of Spain for a month, but I do have a render / image I was working on before I departed, using Photoshop I wanted to see if I could create an underwater setting with the Nautilus.

Good or bad here is the result, it’s still a work in progress and something I will be returning too once I have worked out a half way decent approach to really make it stand out.

Nautilus-from the depth she came 1

I am happy with this first attempt.

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 10

Redesigned the Propeller


I redesigned the propeller as I thought after looking at the one I originally made just looked wrong, so I looked around the web and thought the SS Great Britain (1845) propeller is a good place to work from as the novel is based in 1866.

Nautilus aft3

1200px-Great_Britain_propeller_and_rudder_wideshot
Great Britain propeller

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 9 “Availible for Sale”

The Nautilus


Is now available for CGI artists on Foundation3d on-line Store (link below) only in Lightwave 3d format (lwo) at this time and also hosted on Gumroad

Nautilus store

© Gerard Duffy

store1

© Gerard Duffy

The purchaser may use this for profitable gain through Artwork, Animation, Book covers, Prints etc, 3D-Printing this model is expressly forbidden. Both links opens in a new window


Link to 3DModel on GUMROAD
https://gumroad.com/l/JBIju

Hosted also on Foundation 3d Store
Link to 3DModel on FD3D

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 8

Nautilus Version 2 Completed


This is my latest post with this model in WIP or Work in Progress stage and the UV map is done to my satisfaction. “UV mapping is the 3D modeling process of making a 2D image representation of a 3D model’s surface”.

 >>>>> Click on Images to see full size <<<<<

 

Final Nautilus 001Final Nautilus 002Final Nautilus 003Final Nautilus 004


Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 6

The Nautilus is finished.


Next to do is to see how well it can be 3dprinted next week.

(it cannot be 3dprinted a nightmare)

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Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 5

The Nautilus getting a reworked “Raker”


Nautilus 0012

I debated for a while about introducing the “Raker”. but I feel that it would be useful for protecting the Pilot house a little when ramming ships as it is the Nautilus mission when Professor Arranox first encounters Captain Nemo.

None the less, it is nearing it end (thankfully), it is not easy to design at all. to designers out there that visit this blog (if any).. I take my hat of to you.

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 4

Update on the Nautilus


I don’t have much time for 3d at the moment , but I was able to have a day or so to finished of the dreaded Nuts and Bolts around the Hull, this is not fun and I will not be repeating them any-time soon.

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Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 3

I have added a load of rivets and I can tell you I really don’t like them any more 🙂

 

 

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 2

This the plan of the Nautilus

 

Nautilus14 plan


Some Figures
Source !!
 http://www.vernianera.com/Nautilus/

Some details of the Nautilus as described by Verne are subject to interpretation and some may have been obscured in translation, but many are clearly stated. The largest portion of the information is found in the chapters titled “The Nautilus” (included in “The Man of the Seas” in incomplete translations), “All by Electricity”, and “Some Figures”. Additional information is scattered throughout the novel. Here’s a summary of the details.

The Nautilus had a cylindrical hull 70 meters long and 8 meters wide. The double hull had tapered ends, as Nemo says to Aronnax, “like your cigar”. (Nemo mentions the shape had already been adopted in London. This was the time of the “cigar ships”.)

The four bladed propeller was six meters in diameter with a pitch of 7.5 meters. When the Nautilus accidentally rammed the Scotia it produced a two-meter triangular hole. There was an ordinary rudder fixed to the stern and two diving planes fastened to the sides at the center of floatation. On the surface the Nautilus remained 90% underwater so its platform was 0.8 meter above the water. The platform had a structure of “medium height” with inclined sides, at each end. Forward was the wheelhouse with a 2-meter-square interior and four windows, nearly a foot thick, through which the pilot could see in all directions. Aft was the powerful light. A recession amidships held the longboat, described later as a rising enough above the deck to sit on. The platform also had a railing. Aronnax gives somewhat conflicting descriptions of the hull, first saying it is clearly metal, not looking like a living beast at all, but later describes the overlapping hull plates as resembling scales or a reptile’s shell.

Verne provides considerable information about the interior, especially the forward end. There was a 7.5-meter air reservoir at the very bow. Moving aft, we find Aronnax’s cabin (2.5 meters long), Nemo’s cabin (five meters long). Next was the drawing room/salon/museum, ten meters long, six wide, and five high. This incredible room contained an organ, an art collection of great value and very large number of marine specimens. There was also a fountain made from a shell about two meters across. Finally, the salon had two large oblong windows protected by sliding panels. Moving aft, the next room was the library (five meters long) with 12,000 volumes, followed by the captain’s dining room (also five meters). Both of these rooms were exquisitely furnished.

There were watertight bulkheads between the dining room and the library and salon and the captain’s cabin.

Near the midpoint of the boat the description becomes less clear. There was a central staircase leading to the deck platform and to the upper passage to the wheelhouse. There was also a ladder to the longboat, and somewhere near was the airlock used for underwater access. The central section had at least one and possibly two watertight bulkheads. The size of this central section is not given.

Moving aft there was a small cabin (two meters long), and the galley (three meters) located between storerooms. Nearby was a bathroom with hot and cold taps. Next was the crew’s berth room (five meters). There was one more watertight bulkhead and then the engine room, described as at least 20 meters long. It had a front part devoted to generating electricity and a rear part with machinery to turn the propeller.

Adding all the figures given accounts for 65 meters of the boat’s total 70-meter length perhaps leaving five meters for the central section.

Source !!
 http://www.vernianera.com/Nautilus/

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 1

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus


Here is my new and latest design, again I am doing the Nautilus but with less attention to Harper Goff’s Disney design and giving a more basic design, It is still in WIP stage and other details need to be worked out..

Slightly longer than the 70 meters length and the 8 meters width as mentioned in the book “Jules Verne,  20000 Leagues Under the Sea”, the extra is taken up by the Spar, Rudder and side Planes, but the shell of the hull is 70 meters.

The Salon is ten meters long, six meters wide, and five meters high.

Gerard