Jules Verne Nautilus Poster A1

Image

I finally completed my Jules Verne “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” Nautilus design, I took some time to think over and finish it.

I also had it printed, A1 size poster and I am well pleased, just need to have it framed, I am loading a small sample and a link to anyone who like to have it, I have recived requests from time to time for this, including in French, Itailan, Russian and I will add Spanish.

One of the most magnificent rooms on the Nautilus is the drawing room/salon/museum, ten meters long, six wide, and five high. This incredible room contained an organ, an art collection of great value and very large number of marine specimens. There was also a fountain made from a shell about two meters across

Artist : Painting and year completed
So being the obsessive chap I can be with some designs, I tried to find artist and painting suggested by Verne, though these painting are in museums collections around the world and are not entombed with the Captain and Nautilus for eternity beneath a volcanic island 
Here is the list of artist and works I used, I tried to keep them all in a time frame that they where collected just before Professor Pierre Aronnax, a French marine biologist and narrator of the story and his faithful servant Conseil and Canadian Ned Land boarded the Nautilus and meeting the mysterious Captain Nemo.

Raffaello: Small Cowper Madonna 1505
Leonardo da Vinci: Virgin of the Rocks 1491 -1508
Correggio: Jupiter and Io 1520 – 1540
Titian: La Bella 1536
Veronese: Adoration of the Shepheads 1523
Murillo: Assumption of the Virgin 1680
Holbein: Portrait of Boniface Amerbach 1519
Velázquez: Luncheon 1617
Ribera: Martyrdom of St Barthomew 1630
Rubens: The Village Fête 1635
Teniers: River landscape & rainbow Flemish Landscape 1644-1690
Teniers: Château Drij Toren at Perck 1660
Gerrit Dou: Astronomer by Candlelight 1665
Gabriel Metsu: Le Vieux Buveur 1650-1667
Paulus Potter: 2 Horses Near a Gate 1649
Gericault: The Kiss 1822
Prud’hon: Portrait of the King of Rome 1811
Bakhuizen: Dutch Merchant Ships in a Storm 1670-1690
Bakhuizen: Seascape and Fishing Boats 1708
Vernet: Mediterranean night 1753
Vernet: Shipwreak 1772
Troyon: The Gooseherd 1850-1855
Delacroix: Orphen Girl 1823
Ingres: The Spring 1820-1856
Decamps: Children Gathering Flowers 1844
Daubigny: Bateaux sur l’Oise 1865
Meissonier: Chess players 1853

Jules Verne Voyages extraordinaires have found so many fans the world over, I hope my personal vision of the Nautilus is enjoyed half as much as I enjoyed seeing so many other designs out there, a notable mention has to be Harper Goff fantastic design from the 1954 Disney film “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea”.

Follow the link below

https://www.ArtPal.com/gmd3ddesigns

CGI Models for Sale: Royalty Free: Lightwave3d

Lightwave3d Models for Sale

These are my Lightwave3d models I designed and are now up for sale most are Royalty Free, for use in your  Art and Animation for profit, 3d printing is not permitted though.


 

1h 1g 44 43

© Gerard Duffy

© Gerard Duffy

Nautilus aft3

 

halcon-mk1-and-mk2

Link to the models hosted on Gumroad

https://gumroad.com/gmd3d#

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 9 “Availible for Sale”

The Nautilus


Is now available for CGI artists on Foundation3d on-line Store (link below) only in Lightwave 3d format (lwo) at this time and also hosted on Gumroad

Nautilus store

© Gerard Duffy

store1

© Gerard Duffy

The purchaser may use this for profitable gain through Artwork, Animation, Book covers, Prints etc, 3D-Printing this model is expressly forbidden. Both links opens in a new window


Link to 3DModel on GUMROAD
https://gumroad.com/l/JBIju

Hosted also on Foundation 3d Store
Link to 3DModel on FD3D

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 6

The Nautilus is finished.


Next to do is to see how well it can be 3dprinted next week.

(it cannot be 3dprinted a nightmare)

Nautilus 0015

Nautilus 0016

Nautilus 0017

Nautilus 0018

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 5

The Nautilus getting a reworked “Raker”


Nautilus 0012

I debated for a while about introducing the “Raker”. but I feel that it would be useful for protecting the Pilot house a little when ramming ships as it is the Nautilus mission when Professor Arranox first encounters Captain Nemo.

None the less, it is nearing it end (thankfully), it is not easy to design at all. to designers out there that visit this blog (if any).. I take my hat of to you.

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 4

Update on the Nautilus


I don’t have much time for 3d at the moment , but I was able to have a day or so to finished of the dreaded Nuts and Bolts around the Hull, this is not fun and I will not be repeating them any-time soon.

Nautilus 0004

Nautilus 0005

Nautilus 0006

Nautilus 0007

Nautilus 0008

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 2

This the plan of the Nautilus

 

Nautilus14 plan


Some Figures
Source !!
 http://www.vernianera.com/Nautilus/

Some details of the Nautilus as described by Verne are subject to interpretation and some may have been obscured in translation, but many are clearly stated. The largest portion of the information is found in the chapters titled “The Nautilus” (included in “The Man of the Seas” in incomplete translations), “All by Electricity”, and “Some Figures”. Additional information is scattered throughout the novel. Here’s a summary of the details.

The Nautilus had a cylindrical hull 70 meters long and 8 meters wide. The double hull had tapered ends, as Nemo says to Aronnax, “like your cigar”. (Nemo mentions the shape had already been adopted in London. This was the time of the “cigar ships”.)

The four bladed propeller was six meters in diameter with a pitch of 7.5 meters. When the Nautilus accidentally rammed the Scotia it produced a two-meter triangular hole. There was an ordinary rudder fixed to the stern and two diving planes fastened to the sides at the center of floatation. On the surface the Nautilus remained 90% underwater so its platform was 0.8 meter above the water. The platform had a structure of “medium height” with inclined sides, at each end. Forward was the wheelhouse with a 2-meter-square interior and four windows, nearly a foot thick, through which the pilot could see in all directions. Aft was the powerful light. A recession amidships held the longboat, described later as a rising enough above the deck to sit on. The platform also had a railing. Aronnax gives somewhat conflicting descriptions of the hull, first saying it is clearly metal, not looking like a living beast at all, but later describes the overlapping hull plates as resembling scales or a reptile’s shell.

Verne provides considerable information about the interior, especially the forward end. There was a 7.5-meter air reservoir at the very bow. Moving aft, we find Aronnax’s cabin (2.5 meters long), Nemo’s cabin (five meters long). Next was the drawing room/salon/museum, ten meters long, six wide, and five high. This incredible room contained an organ, an art collection of great value and very large number of marine specimens. There was also a fountain made from a shell about two meters across. Finally, the salon had two large oblong windows protected by sliding panels. Moving aft, the next room was the library (five meters long) with 12,000 volumes, followed by the captain’s dining room (also five meters). Both of these rooms were exquisitely furnished.

There were watertight bulkheads between the dining room and the library and salon and the captain’s cabin.

Near the midpoint of the boat the description becomes less clear. There was a central staircase leading to the deck platform and to the upper passage to the wheelhouse. There was also a ladder to the longboat, and somewhere near was the airlock used for underwater access. The central section had at least one and possibly two watertight bulkheads. The size of this central section is not given.

Moving aft there was a small cabin (two meters long), and the galley (three meters) located between storerooms. Nearby was a bathroom with hot and cold taps. Next was the crew’s berth room (five meters). There was one more watertight bulkhead and then the engine room, described as at least 20 meters long. It had a front part devoted to generating electricity and a rear part with machinery to turn the propeller.

Adding all the figures given accounts for 65 meters of the boat’s total 70-meter length perhaps leaving five meters for the central section.

Source !!
 http://www.vernianera.com/Nautilus/

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus 1

Concept Design: Jules Verne’s Nautilus


Here is my new and latest design, again I am doing the Nautilus but with less attention to Harper Goff’s Disney design and giving a more basic design, It is still in WIP stage and other details need to be worked out..

Slightly longer than the 70 meters length and the 8 meters width as mentioned in the book “Jules Verne,  20000 Leagues Under the Sea”, the extra is taken up by the Spar, Rudder and side Planes, but the shell of the hull is 70 meters.

The Salon is ten meters long, six meters wide, and five meters high.

Gerard

Mobilis in mobili Part 8

The Nautilus


Amazing I forgot to post my completed model of the Nautilus here (minus textures). I hope you like the result.

Inspired by Jules Verne and the vision of Harper Goff

The Nautilus.

Mobilis in mobili Part 5

The Nautilus


Minor Update

Working on the hull plates and a basic texture look.. which will need more work.

Next will be the nuts and bolts

Mobilis in mobili Part 4

The Nautilus


A change of direction in the colour scheme.

With the Hull Plates closed over the Lounge window with the sliding hatches slid back to reveal the lounge porthole.

Side view with characters there to help illustrate the scale, if your wondering why some guys looking like they are taking it easy, They represent the location of the dingy that can if my memory serves hold a dozen crew.

 


 

Mobilis in mobili Part 3

The Nautilus


Some new images, the hull plating is modelled and I will look at textures soon.I retained the Disney Nautilus look around the helm control area. I just did not want to use a box shape that’s implied in the book.

I have also added the lounge windows with sliding panels that move to the side to reveal.

 

Mobilis in mobili Part 2

The Nautilus


Some new images, slightly longer than 70 meters as I planed to model and wider. almost ready to detail the model. I am happy with the progress of the design and perhaps even Jules Verne would think it OK

 

Mobilis in mobili Part 1

The Nautilus


Its been a while since I posted anything of interest, my interests have diverted from Star Trek and modern Sci-fi to the older era, The Jules Verne stories in particular, specifically in this case 20000 Leagues Under the Sea and the Nautilus, as a child I first discovered the story in Disney´s excellent and entertaining film in the 1954 film of the same name.

If you have not seen or read it, I highly recommend it.

Mobilis in mobili is the motto used to describe the Nautilus by Captain Nemo (or Prince Dakkar) as he reveals himself to be in a follow-up book by Jules Verne called “The Mysterious Island”.

Its described as been 70 meter long and 8 meters wide and I am been building the model to that scale or as close as I can get….. no height is given so I have a free had there…. The Nautilus is also meant to have Hydroplanes to the side somewhere to rise and lower the sub as needed like modern subs.

It’s hard to move away from the fantastic design used in the Disney film, designed by Harper Goff who was inspired by the Shark and Crocodile for his approach and very Victorian in feel, I think it works very, very well.

Nautilus

Non the less, This is my design so far. where my only real Harper Goff ref is the curved spar used to ram any ships, serving the need to protect the control room from directly hitting the bottom of a ship’s keel. I also built a small platform which i slightly curved and in the centre of that a small boat position. my problem is making a simple cylinder interesting ….. not that easy …..