Constitution Class Reworked

Last renders until the new year, I realized I never rendered this in a scene?  time to change that and see how it looked. I am pleased it it, and find I want to add some new subtle details. but that will be in the new year, so until then happy holidays and prosperous new year in 2018.

 

Reboot in Bright Nebula Ali 3Reboot in Bright Nebula Ali 1Reboot in Bright Nebula AliReboot in Bright Nebula Ali 2D

Happy Holidays and New Year 2018

While I am taking a break from the Nautilus submarine design I made a short video showing my favourite top 20 star trek designs, I have used images / screen-caps from films and episodes found on line save one image of the Daedalus class as its never had any screen time (to my knowledge) but found a great rendering of a Daedalus class by the Dean of Trek Doug Drexler and I included Ilia theme by Jerry Goldsmith to set the tone.
In every Star Trek group, the question arises what are your favourite Star Trek designs so I have as mentioned above selected 20 designs I like, number one placement goes from the original Enterprise and moves on from there, there are a number of reasons for my selection which I will not go into in so many words.

Mostly the designs I like the most are those that follow the Gene Roddenberry Starship design rules passed on to Andrew Probert.

The List in order


01 Constitution-class

02 Constitution-class Refit
03 Galaxy-class
04 Excelsior-class
05 Miranda-class
06 Sovereign-class
07 Ambassador-class
08 Constellation-class
09 Intrepid-class
10 NX-class
11 Oberth-class
12 Akira-class
13 Nova-class
14 Nebula-class
15 Defiant-class
16 Monarch-class freighter
(Merchantmen Star Trek 3 The Search for Spock)
17 Antares-type
18 Daedalus-class
19 Danube-class
20 Class J starship
TOP20
These different classes are explained on Memory Alpha
Link to Vimeo Video below

 

Nautilus WIP

These designs seem to take me longer to complete, was it always so, but the exterior has been reworked minus textures, I may not bother doing it for this build but I will see once I have finished the interior and this time I mean to finish it, in 2018.

Here are some new images, reworked the nuts and bolts, though I did say I’d never do them again, alas I could not leave well enough alone and they have all been redone, a real time consuming effort, boy am I a grump today.

Overall the design is the same but with tweaks that I think improve the look a little more, the scale is the same, hatches except for a new forward hatch is the same, I need to tweak the salon window, I think its too large and needs some structural elements.

Thanks for looking

 

 

Nautilus Redo

New rivets and oblong window on the Nautilus, taking cue’s from the illustrations by Alphonse de Neuville and Édouard Riou for the novel.  I was not intending to rework the exterior, but what can I say, I am a fan.

Changing the look of things

Regular visitors will note I have changed the look of my blog,  with my current interest and return to the amazing adventure’s created by Jules Verne and his voyages extraordinaires, aboard the Nautilus with Captain Nemo and his somewhat unwilling passengers, Professor Pierre Aronnax, a French marine biologist and narrator of the story,  Canadian whaler and master harpoonist Ned Land and Aronnax’s faithful servant Conseil, I thought a change of look was just the ticket.

I have no updates for the design yet, what I thought was a minor change to the interior of the Nautilus and exterior a minor touch up has gone down the tubes, I keep wanting to tweak the design.

I started to read The Extraordinary Journeys: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the SeaTranslated with an Introduction and Notes by William Butcher Oxford World’s Classics
ISBN-13: 978-0192828392
ISBN-10: 0192828398

My friend Chris Martin suggested it a few years ago and I have not regretted the purchase, I also recommend it.

“The novel was first translated into English in 1873 by Reverend Lewis Page Mercier. Mercier cut nearly a quarter of Verne’s original text and made hundreds of translation errors, sometimes dramatically changing the meaning of Verne’s original intent (including uniformly mistranslating French scaphandre — properly “diving apparatus” — as “cork-jacket”, following a long-obsolete meaning as “a type of lifejacket“). Some of these mistranslations have been done for political reasons, such as Nemo’s identity and the nationality of the two warships he sinks, or the portraits of freedom fighters on the wall of his cabin which originally included Daniel O’Connell.[8] Nonetheless, it became the standard English translation for more than a hundred years, while other translations continued to draw from it and its mistakes (especially the mistranslation of the title; the French title actually means Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas).

In 1998 William Butcher issued a new, annotated translation from the French original, published by Oxford University Press, with the title Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Seas. He includes detailed notes, an extensive bibliography, appendices and a wide-ranging introduction studying the novel from a literary perspective. In particular, his original research on the two manuscripts studies the radical changes to the plot and to the character of Nemo forced on Verne by the first publisher, Jules Hetzel.
English_translations

 Which has opened up the novel in new and interesting ways, its still very much like a undersea travel log but that is part of its appeal even now. I hope to included a number of features as described by Verne in the novel, but as to how far I go, we’ll have to wait and see.

I hope to have some new renders in a few days at least the external look, I cannot see myself reworking the nuts and bolts as I had with the older version, no I cannot.

Thanks for viewing

Gerard